Home

Wait a minute.

I have learned from books, English teachers, and friends of mine who are sticklers for correct usage that when using the verb crave, we do not add the preposition for. 

Thus:

And so I lived happily ever after.

Until today.

I was fiddling with Maverick, the newest OS of Apple, and I checked out its newish Oxford Dictionary of English (the built-in app replacing the last OS’s Oxford American Dictionary).

The dictionary entry for crave now allows for. And gave me the example: Will craved for family life.

No way.

But wait. There’s more!

So do the other dictionaries:

  • Merriam-Webster uses after when using the intransitive verb crave  (to have a strong or inward desire). Example: craves after affection.
  • Collins Dictionary states that the intransitive verb crave is followed by for or by after.
  • Macmillan Dictionary gives this example: Lewis still craves for the recognition he feels he lacks in America.
  • Random House Dictionary states that when crave means “to beg or plead,” it is followed by for.

Oh well. Learning is sometimes unlearning.

Photo credit: Healing Hypnotherapy

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s