Home

Can we say attires?

Nope, we can’t.

Attire is a noncount noun–it is always singular and cannot be counted. Attire refers to a set of clothes, usually fine or formal (Oxford Advanced American Dictionary).

Examples:

  • Proper attire is required at the restaurant. (Learner’s Dictionary)
  • If you want to make the best impression on my father, come in holiday attire.

Photo credit: Stylearound.com

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Attire

  1. Hi Ma’am Janet,

    Thanks for sharing.

    Btw, is this correctly stated? I heard a number of times this sentence…. “I don’t know about you but for me, ….” In tagalog, Hindi ko alam sa inyo, pero sa akin…

    REgards,

    Rene

    • Hi, Rene!

      We can write that thought in a number of ways, I think.

      We can write, “I don’t know about you, but I’d rather cook than eat out.” No need to add the phrase “for me.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s